6 New Deals (Bosworth, Cantor, Condie, Hastings, Stiefvater, Gratton, Yovanoff, Zappia)

Struck author Jennifer Bosworth‘s The Killing Jar (2014) to Farrar, Straus Children’s. A teen girl is abducted to a utopian commune, where she discovers a shocking connection between an unthinkable crime against her family and the commune leaders, who hide an arcane secret about her past.

Jillian Cantor‘s I Am Sky. A teen boy and girl are “saved” from the remote island where they’ve lived their entire lives, only to discover that the real world may not be the paradise they’ve been hoping for.

Ally Condie‘s two new books to Dutton Children’s (NA). The first book (scheduled for 2014) tells the story of Rio, who has waited her whole life for the opportunity to leave her safe, underwater city of Atlantia for life on the surface. But when her life takes an unexpected twist and Rio must remain below, she is left with increasingly dangerous questions about the complex political and religious system constructed to govern the fragile divide between land and sea.

Avery Hastings‘ two books and an e-novella to St. Martin’s Press. Feuds, first in an epic series pitched as having echoes of Romeo and Juliet and Gattaca, in which a ballerina who has been genetically engineered for perfection falls for a rising star in an underground cage-fighting ring, and together they must face the deadly virus threatening to tear her perfect world apart from the inside out.

Maggie Stiefvater, Tessa Gratton, & Brenna Yovanoff‘s The Anatomy of Curiosity (2014) to Carolrhoda Lab (World English). A companion to their earlier The Curiosities, and a conversational step-by-step guide to their writing/critiquing process and relationship, with new original stories by the authors in first and final draft forms.

Francesca Zappia‘s Ask Again Later to Greenwillow (World English). About the ultimate unreliable narrator: a schizophrenic teenage girl unable to tell the difference between reality and delusion, who discovers – thanks to her Magic 8 ball, her little sister, and a boy she thought was imaginary – that sometimes there really is someone out to get you.

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