[REVIEW] Tsunami Blue – Gayle Ann Williams

Gayle Ann Williams
Tsunami Blue
Dorchester Love Spell (US: 30th March 2010)
Buy (US) Buy (UK) Buy (CA) Buy (Worldwide)

Blue was in Thailand when the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami killed her parents and twin brother, and many others. After that, her uncle raised her in the San Juan Islands, teaching her to become a killing machine as that would ensure her survival in a dangerous world where pirate Runners murderously reign over the seas – and any land they come across.

It’s 2023, and Blue has been taking to the airwaves to broadcast when she senses upcoming tsunamis. When a person washes ashore, he’s barely alive. Blue rescues him, before she discovers that Gabriel Black is a Runner. Or “was”. Gabriel claims he wants to save Blue from those who want to hold Blue hostage to keep her psychic gift to themselves, but she doesn’t know if she trusts him.

The story’s a bit episodic at first, but that soon changes. When Blue hits Vancouver, the tension and plot really step up, with high stakes, cage fighting, and plenty more deadly encounters in store. There are numerous opportunities for Blue and/or Gabriel to die, and that they survive it all really tests one’s suspension of disbelief.

The world-building is eerily realistic, though my scant lack of altitude knowledge makes it a little baffling. I would’ve assumed the islands would be underwater, instead of Seattle, but that’s my un-intelligence talking. As well as the San Juan Islands, countless packets of Starbucks Christmas Blend have also survived, and they’re name-checked so often here that the coffee company really should sell this book in their stores. Or at least send the author some free Christmas Blend 😉

Adding “New” to a place name to remind readers that a story is set in the future? Not cool! In real life, there’s a state named New South Wales; it is not near Wales. There’s a country named New Caledonia; it is not near Caledonia (which I’ve heard is another name for Scotland). Get it yet? These places aren’t just the same spots with an added “New” to their names; they’re located elsewhere in the world.

I blame the Futurama effect of adding “New” to the same cities to remind audiences that it’s futuristic. Since then, I’ve seen “New Chicago” in two different book series, and here we have “New Vancouver”. Writers, please don’t do this.

Tsunami Blue is a fun, quick read, and I like it a lot more than this review may suggest. (I’m in a bad mood today.)

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